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Prostate
Study finds widespread vitamin and mineral use among cancer survivors
By Dross at 2008-02-01 21:37
 

SEATTLE – Use of vitamin and mineral supplements among cancer survivors is widespread, despite inconclusive evidence that such use is beneficial, according to a comprehensive review of scientific literature conducted by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and published Feb. 1 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“Can vitamin and herbal supplements reduce the adverse effects of cancer treatment, decrease the risk of cancer recurrence or improve a patient’s chances of survival? We don’t really know. Research into these matters has been minimal,” said senior author Cornelia (Neli) Ulrich, Ph.D., an associate member of the Hutchinson Center’s Public Health Sciences Division. “While supplement use may be beneficial for some patients, such as those who cannot eat a balanced diet, research suggests that certain supplements may actually interfere with treatment or even accelerate cancer growth,” she said.

read more | 1 comment | 1253 reads

New, non-invasive prostate cancer test beats PSA in detecting prostate cancer, researchers report
By Dross at 2008-02-01 21:36
 

An experimental biomarker test developed by researchers at the University of Michigan more accurately detects prostate cancer than any other screening method currently in use, according to a study published in the February 1 issue of Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

The researchers say a simple urine test that screens for the presence of four different RNA molecules accurately identified 80 percent of patients in a study who were later found to have prostate cancer, and was 61 percent effective in ruling out disease in other study participants.

read more | 778 reads

Prostate cancer: Watchful wait or vaccinate?
By Dross at 2008-02-01 21:35
 

PHILADELPHIA – Researchers at the University of Southern California have developed a prostate cancer vaccine that prevented the development of cancer in 90 percent of young mice genetically predestined to develop the disease. In the February 1 issue of Cancer Research, they suggest the same strategy might work for men with rising levels of PSA (prostate specific antigen), a potential diagnostic indicator of prostate cancer.

“By early vaccination, we have basically given these mice life-long protection against a disease they were destined to have,” said the study’s lead investigator, W. Martin Kast, Ph.D., a professor of Molecular Microbiology & Immunology and Obstetrics & Gynecology at the Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center. “This has never been done before and, with further research, could represent a paradigm shift in the management of human prostate cancer.”

read more | 1216 reads

Researchers investigate links between prostate, cadmium, zinc
By Dross at 2008-01-31 21:16
 

Cadmium exposure is a known risk factor for prostate cancer, and a new University of Rochester study suggests that zinc may offer protection against cadmium.

In an article published in the February 2008 journal, The Prostate, epidemiologist Edwin van Wijngaarden, Ph.D., reports that PSA levels were 22 percent higher among American men who had zinc levels below the median (less than 12.67 mg/daily) and cadmium levels above the median. (PSA is a protein produced by the cells of the prostate gland. The higher a man’s PSA level, the more likely cancer is present.)

In contrast, among men with a greater than median zinc intake, little evidence of an association between cadmium and PSA was found.

read more | 1165 reads

Urinary dysfunction troubles men who undergo prostate removal
By Dross at 2008-01-31 01:40
 

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Men with prostate cancer who have their prostate removed cite sexual dysfunction as the most common side effect after surgery, but urinary dysfunction troubles these patients most, reports a University of Florida researcher. What’s more, many aren’t emotionally prepared to face these complications.

The study findings, published in a recent issue of Urologic Nursing, underscore the need for health-care practitioners to educate their patients about the physical and psychological effects the surgery will have on their everyday lives.

“The effects of this treatment are quite immediate and can lead to depression and frustration,” said Bryan Weber, Ph.D., A.R.N.P., an assistant professor in the UF College of Nursing and the study’s lead author. “After an initial diagnosis of prostate cancer, men may be so focused on eradicating the disease that they don’t realize the effects the treatment will have on their quality of life, both for them and their families.”

read more | 697 reads

Pros, cons of drug proven to prevent prostate cancer should be considered, researchers recommend
By Dross at 2008-01-21 21:35
 

DALLAS – Jan. 21, 2008 – Findings by UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers encourage men to weigh both the potential benefits and side effectsterm of the drug finasteride before taking it to prevent prostate cancer.

In today’s online issue of Cancer, UT Southwestern doctors analyzed data gathered by the National Cancer Institute’s Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, or PCPT. The trial, which began in October 1993, was designed to test whether finasteride could prevent prostate cancer in men 55 years of age and older. It was stopped early in June 2003 when an analysis showed that finasteride reduced the risk of developing prostate cancer by 25 percent.

read more | 1111 reads

New gene test for prostate cancer at hand
By Dross at 2008-01-18 00:03
 

At present, men with suspected prostate cancer are identified mainly using what are known as PSA tests. However, the test has a relatively low sensitivity and better methods are needed.

"In the near future, it will be possible to combine PSA tests with simple genetic tests," says Professor Henrik Grönberg at Karolinska Institutet. "This means that fewer men will have to undergo unnecessary biopsies and that more prostate cancer diagnoses can be made."

It has long been known that prostate cancer is partly caused by inherited factors, which makes some men more likely to develop the disease than others. Five relatively common gene variants that affect this risk have so far been identified. However, each of these variants affects the risk only marginally, and knowledge of them has been of no real benefit to individual patients.

read more | 878 reads

SGX Initiates Phase I Trials for SGX523 for Breast, Colon, Prostate
By Dross at 2008-01-17 02:02
 

SGX Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ:SGXP) today announced that it has opened enrollment in two Phase I studies, with the first patient being treated on January 14, 2008. The Phase I studies are designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetic profile of SGX523, an internally developed, orally-bioavailable, small molecule inhibitor of the cMET receptor tyrosine kinase.

The Phase I clinical trials are open-label, dose escalation studies of SGX523 administered orally to patients with advanced cancer who have either failed standard therapy or for whom no standard therapy exists. The studies are designed to explore two dosing regimens in parallel. The continuous dosing trial will have continuous uninterrupted twice daily dosing with patients being evaluated every 28 days for continuation of treatment. The intermittent dosing schedule will implement twice daily dosing on a 14 days on/7 days off therapy schedule, cycling every 21 days. In both protocols, patients may continue on therapy for up to 12 months as determined by the patient's response and tolerance to SGX523.

read more | 2351 reads

Hormonal dietary supplements might promote prostate cancer progression
By Dross at 2008-01-15 21:14
 

DALLAS – Jan. 15, 2008 – Hormonal components in over-the-counter dietary supplements may promote the progression of prostate cancer and decrease the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have discovered.

The findings, which appear in today’s issue of Clinical Cancer Research, reaffirm that patients should inform their doctors about any herbal or hormonal dietary supplements they are taking or considering taking. The researchers also recommend that documentation of supplement usage become part of routine health assessments for all patients, particularly cancer patients.

read more | 913 reads

Common Molecule Notifies Immune System of Prostate Cancer
By Dross at 2008-01-11 03:43
 

In experiments with mice, researchers have found that the body's immune system can use a surprisingly common molecule to recognize prostate tumors. The molecule comes from a protein found in all cells of the body; however, immune cells appear to respond to it only when it is present on the surface of cells within a tumor.

Understanding how this protein, known as histone H4, signals the immune system to respond to malignant cells may help researchers refine immunotherapy strategies that harness the body's own immune system to fight tumors. Some types of immunotherapy are already being tested in patients, but many questions remain unanswered. In particular, researchers want to know if tumor cells display molecular signposts that tell the immune system, “I'm a cancer cell, destroy me.”

read more | 1 comment | 1016 reads

Fatherhood linked to prostate cancer risk
By Dross at 2008-01-07 23:27
 

A new study from Danish researchers has found that childless men have a lower risk of developing prostate cancer than fathers, and that, paradoxically, the more children a father has, the lower the risk of the disease. The study appears in the February 15, 2008 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.

Whether fatherhood can affect the risk of prostate cancer remains controversial. Evidence has suggested that childless men may be at lower risk of prostate cancer than men with children, and that men who father sons may be at lower risk than men with daughters only. To address the issue, researchers led by Kristian Jørgensen of the Statens Serum Institut, in Copenhagen, Denmark, used a national population-based register to analyze data from all men born in Denmark between 1935 and 1988, among which 3,400 developed prostate cancer. They found men without children were 16 percent less likely than those with children to be diagnosed with prostate cancer during up to 35-years of follow up. The analysis also revealed that among fathers, there was a gradually reduced prostate cancer risk with increasing number of children. The authors suggest that, theoretically, this might reflect a “healthy father” phenomenon, in which men who retain fertility are less likely to develop a malignancy. The study found no association between prostate risk and child gender.

read more | 767 reads

Jefferson scientists find protein potential drug target for treatment-resistant prostate cancer
By admin at 2008-01-01 02:28
 

(PHILADELPHIA) Scientists at Jefferson’s Kimmel Cancer Center in Philadelphia have found that a signaling protein that is key to prostate cancer cell growth is turned on in nearly all recurrent prostate cancers that are resistant to hormone therapy. If the findings hold up, the protein, called Stat5, may be a specific drug target against an extremely difficult-to-treat cancer.

In addition, the researchers, led by Marja Nevalainen, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of Cancer Biology at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, also showed that the convergence of two biological pathways could be responsible for making such hormone-resistant prostate cancers especially dangerous. They have found that a synergy between Stat5 and hormone receptors in recurrent prostate cancer cells helps each maintain its activity. Dr. Nevalainen and her co-workers report their findings January 1, 2008 in the journal Cancer Research.

read more | 1125 reads

Panacea Pharmaceuticals Initiates GMP Manufacturing of Prostate Cancer Diagnostic Test Kits
By Dross at 2007-12-12 22:52
 

Panacea Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has initiated manufacturing of PC Detect(SM) kits, the Company's diagnostic test for prostate cancer, under GMP conditions. Data on the performance of the PC Detect(SM) kit will be included in a Premarket Approval (PMA) application for this diagnostic test to be filed with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in early 2008. To date, PC Detect(SM) has demonstrated sensitivity and specificity of greater than 90 percent in identifying men with prostate cancer. PC Detect(SM) was initially launched in May 2007 as a laboratory service by Panacea Laboratories, a division of Panacea Pharmaceuticals; Panacea Laboratories is regulated under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA) to perform high-complexity testing. FDA approval of a PC Detect(SM) kit will facilitate the wider distribution and availability of this diagnostic test through clinical laboratories and hospitals across the U.S. The Company is seeking to identify one or more partner companies to facilitate the distribution and commercialization of the PC Detect(SM) kit in the U.S. and other countries.

The PC Detect(SM) kit, as with the PC Detect(SM) laboratory service, requires a small serum sample and measures blood levels of Human Aspartyl (Asparaginyl) Beta-Hydroxylase (HAAH), a cancer biomarker. HAAH has been established as an excellent biomarker for many types of cancer, including prostate cancer. The protein is typically undetectable in sera from cancer-free individuals, thus, an elevated serum protein level of HAAH is highly diagnostic for cancer. PC Detect(SM) is recommended as an adjunct to the prostate specific antigen (PSA) test and the digital rectal examination (DRE), the currently recommended prostate cancer screening methods. The addition of PC Detect(SM) to the current screening methods should improve the diagnosis of prostate cancer among men with prostate specific antigen (PSA) values below the currently recommended level for prostate biopsy, and enhance the identification of men recommended for prostate biopsy who are likely to have prostate cancer.

read more | 1237 reads

Gene discovered with link to more potent form of prostate cancer
By Dross at 2007-12-12 09:53
 

Two reports have identified a homologue of the DAB2IP gene which carries a more potent prognosis. Researchers from the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), Wake Forest University School of Medicine, the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, and Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions made the discovery through a collaboration.

The DAB21P gene is thought to be  tumor suppressor suggesting that this protective mechanism goes awry in men with the variant form. The finding, today reported in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, may one day help doctors tailor treatment based on a patient’s genetic makeup.

read more | 843 reads

UC Davis researchers identify a cellular pathway that makes prostate cancer fatal
By Dross at 2007-11-28 20:49
 

(SACRAMENTO, Calif.) — Expanding evidence that tiny strands of RNA – called microRNAs – play big roles in the progress of some cancers, UC Davis researchers have identified one that helps jump start prostate cancer cell growth midway through the disease process, eventually causing it to become fatal. The discovery is an important link to finding new treatments targeting this cellular function and reducing cancer deaths among American men.

“A number of cancer researchers are interested in microRNAs and how they are involved in diseases like leukemiaterm,” said Ralph deVere White, director of the UC Davis Cancer Center, professor of urology and senior author on the study. “But this is the first research to specifically look at the functional effects of microRNAs on the progression of prostate cancer.”

read more | 1139 reads

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